8 Best Jobs For Introverts With Anxiety To Achieve Your True Potential

What are the best jobs for introverts with anxiety?

And which jobs are the least stressful?

If you’re an introvert with anxiety, you’ll find this guide incredibly useful…


What are the best jobs for introverts with anxiety?

Not everybody has the good fortune to have a job they love. But everybody deserves, at the very least, a job that they can bear. 

There are many different aspects of work that can make it unbearable for different kinds of people.

For introverts, it is the social aspect – the level of interaction with other people – that can make the difference between leaving for work with a spring in your step, or dreading the moment you walk through your workplace door.

If you find yourself regularly thinking about calling in sick, walking around the block multiple times before building confidence to go into your place of work, forced to use visualization techniques to calm your mind, or otherwise freaked out about spending time with so many people each day, it could be time to look for a job more suited to an introvert.

See Also: Quick & Healthy Ways To Deal With Stress That Really Work.


Are you an introvert?

First off, it is important to define terms.

The word ‘introvert’ is often bandied about in unhelpful ways that aren’t really connected to the historical meaning of the word.

Being an introvert isn’t about being shy.

Neither is introversion an illness, a condition, or a weakness. It is just a particular disposition that many people happen to have.

We’ve included the best jobs for introverts with anxiety – but if your ideal job isn’t on this list, that doesn’t mean you can’t do it!

In fact, you have the potential to do whatever you want…

Somebody may be more or less of an introvert, or they might even be an extrovert with occasional introvert tendencies.

The best person to decide if you are an introvert is you. Introversion/extroversion is about how you regulate your social energy. (Don’t worry, this has nothing to do with half-baked ideas about spirituality).

Energy here simply means your strength and enthusiasm – i.e. the kind of energy you lose when you’re tired. Broadly speaking:

  • Introverts find social activity tiring and need a while to ‘recharge’ after spending time in a group.
  • Extroverts find solitude tiring, and get their energy from being around other people.

This isn’t the place to go into the disparate psychological or neurological theories behind the so-called ‘ambivert scale.’

It’s enough to say that if you consider yourself to be more in the first category than the second, then there are a lot of very social jobs out there from which you’d run a mile.

So let’s look at the best jobs for introverts with anxiety…

See Also: 14 Reasons Why Anxiety Sucks (And How To Fix Them)


8 Best Jobs For Introverts With Anxiety

1. Social Media Manager

Not all managements jobs are appropriate for introverts.

But, if you love the give and take of human interaction as long as it’s on your own terms, social media is a gift. 

Why is this one of the best jobs for introverts with anxiety?

Social media managers often work from home (all you need is a Wi-Fi connection and a computer) and may take on roles with one or more businesses on a freelance or permanent basis.

Either way, you may never need to come face to face with a colleague or client!

Depending the size of the business you work for, you may have greater or fewer responsibilities.

Social media management isn’t all about posting witty tweets and memes.

A good social media campaign is based on a knowledge of SEO (search engine optimization) and marketing. You will need to research, plan, and execute the campaign on your own or with a PR team that you’ll manage.

And the job isn’t over when the tweets are sent.

The social media manager must constantly analyze results and optimize the process – and occasionally deal with the fallout when the fast-paced cut-and-thrust of your employer’s social media presence goes awry!

Average Salary: $50,040


2. Counselor

Not every ideal introvert job requires you to be alone the whole time.

Introverts are generally rattled by groups, unexpected encounters, or needing to be ‘always-on,’ rather than being energy-zapped by one-on-one situations.

Why is this one of the best jobs for introverts with anxiety?

As a counselor, you mostly deal with one or two people at a time, with gaps in between, and perhaps with your own ‘safe space’ office to recharge between meetings.

Plus, counseling utilizes a lot of the innate talents and instincts that introverts tend to have. While extroverts are quick on the ‘old one-two’ of bouncing ideas off of each other, introverts like to listen closely, digest information, and then formulate a response.

Both approaches have their advantages, but in regular counseling scenarios, the latter is usually more appropriate.

And yes, introverts work well alone. But they also work well when they can quietly discuss and develop ideas face-to-face with one individual person.

Counseling is a great way to strike that balance and provide a useful, caring service to those around you.

Average Salary: $46,959


3. Gardener

Being a gardener is lovely.

It’s hard, all-weather work, but it’s lovely: a fulfilling combination of art, science, physical exertion, and a ‘feel’ for living (and thankfully dumb) beings!

Depending on your gig, you will balance garden design, management, planting, and maintenance. 

Plus, once you start to get some experience, you can choose the kind of environment you would like to work in.

For example, small, one-person jobs, or in a company of three-four people working together – but not too closely together!

You can work in home or institutional gardens, and specialize in particular areas such as Japanese gardens, floral gardens, and/or garden design. 

You don’t need qualifications to become a gardener, but some kind of training is better than none.

You might want to supplement your gardening training with a business course to help you get yourself off the ground as a self-employed gardener.

Average Salary (Maintenance Gardener): $38,742
Average Salary (Head Gardener): $52,000


4. Mail Carrier

Who didn’t watch Cheers as a child and think, “When I grow up, I want to be Cliff Clavin?”

Why is this one of the best jobs for introverts with anxiety?

Mail Carrier is another of those jobs for introverts who neither want to be stuck behind a desk nor isolated entirely from society.

As a gentle warning, mail carriers rarely get through the day without speaking to dozens of people. Some of those people are actually desperate for a nice long chat.

You could almost consider yourself a ‘street counselor.’

But once you learn how to discreetly move on, you can start to cultivate an agreeable level of socialness in your daily work. 

Enjoy the nods and hellos that create a sense of community and belonging, without the high-volume power meetings that blight the office landscape.

And spend much of your day outdoors, keeping your body moving and seeing the world in person rather than through a computer screen.

Average Salary: $48,149


5. Animal Care

Like an understanding partner, animals know how to provide company without the strain of constant small talk.

As an animal care or service worker, you will need to meet the occasional human – but the focus is usually on the furry, feathered, or scaled creature in the middle. 

As with gardening, there are lots of options for animal carers, depending on your preferences. You might work for a company or for yourself, making visits or at fixed premises, dealing with domestic pets, farm animals, or zoo prisoners.

Your duties will include feeding, cleaning, and exercising the animals. You may also need to administer medication.

And you will be responsible for their general well-being, for example looking out for symptoms of illness and contacting the relevant practitioners when necessary.

It’s not the best-paid job in the world, but you get to work with animals – better than humans, right?

It is good for the soul and it’s also good experience if you ever intend to apply for professional qualifications to work with animals on a more specialized level.

Average Salary: $24,000


6. Lawyer

Being a lawyer might seem like a social kind of affair, but around two-thirds of them are said to be introverts.

Of course, different types of lawyer may have different introvert-extrovert figures, but overall the law business seems to be a popular destination for introverts.

How can this be? First off, lawyers are like icebergs. The bit you see in public is representative of just a tiny part of the whole lawyer.

Most of the time, they are sat behind a desk or strolling up and down archive stacks researching and preparing cases or consulting one-on-one or in small groups with clients and experts.

And of course many types of lawyer never end up in a courtroom at all.

Much of the work of fighting a court case is down to this kind of preparation.

It may be that extroverts are better known for coming back with quick retorts, but a good lawyer knows to fight the case at a pace that suits them.

And if they prepare well enough – which introverts are known for – providing the right answers under pressure is a piece of cake.

And finally, just like many movie directors are introverts who step up in front of large groups just a few weeks each year, introverted lawyers aren’t necessarily averse to public-speaking.

Sure, it can take its emotional toll afterwards, but it is possible to get pepped and even enjoy the comfort-zone-zapping experience of a court appearance. As long as you get a few weeks off to recover!

Average Salary: $83,915


7. Film/video editor

Why is this one of the best jobs for introverts with anxiety?

Imagine your job was to sit in the dark by yourself all day quietly patching stretches of audio-visual footage together.

Bliss!

Okay, so being an editor is rarely quite as meditative as that, but it’s definitely a job for someone with a mix of technical and creative prowess who likes to spend long periods of time obsessing alone over the job at hand.

You need to understand the grammar of screen language (the way shots are put together to tell a story or create an effect).

You also need an element of ‘bedside manner,’ as you’ll answer to creatives and producers who won’t always notice the same strengths and weaknesses in their material as you do.

You might work for a TV station, or production company making shows or web content.

While freelance editors are ‘a thing,’ there is always a boss. The director or producer of the project that you are editing may insist on sitting by your side through some or all of the process, depending on how they like to work.

But still, you’re both facing forward looking at the screen.

For long periods of time, all you’ll hear are the voices and sound effects of the video you’re editing and the gentle clack-clack of your fingers running over the keyboard and mouse.

Average Salary: $46,810


8. Engineer

Why is this one of the best jobs for introverts with anxiety?

Okay, so perhaps more than any of the other jobs mentioned, engineering is a highly diverse field in terms of potential work environment.

But your closest relationships as an engineer will be with facts, figures, tools, and machines. 

Each day you will knuckle down to business at your work station or on location. You may need to speak to your boss, a client, or service user, but engineers are generally spared intense group scenarios.

Plus, when you do find yourself around the water cooler or attending a meeting with your colleagues, you’ll find that many of them are just like you: most comfortable discussing ideas and solutions rather than getting lost in mindless chit-chat.

While some engineering jobs revolve around emergency situations that require quick thinking and high-pressure conversations, the majority depend upon considered thought, mathematics, and steady hard work. 

Average Salary (Electrical Engineer): $74,785

See Also: Jobs For People With Anxiety: 25 Fulfilling, Low Stress Jobs


How to succeed as an introvert

These are a few jobs that can suit the temperament of an introvert. But in any job, striving forwards can be a challenge when so much of work is socially-oriented.

Much of the time, the problem isn’t yours – it may be that your boss has you tagged as an introvert and doesn’t think you are capable of certain tasks that you could happily accomplish.

If you’re stuck in a job that challenges you as an introvert, try these tips to make daily life a bit easier and the path to success more clear:

  • Identify the things about being an introvert that is your particular strengths.
  • If the workplace is laid out in a particular social, anti-introvert way, see if there is another space where you can work. Some bosses even allow you to work from home a couple of days a week.
  • Explain to your boss the way you feel when things go wrong. Don’t put yourself down: talk about your strengths and the challenges you would prefer to take on.

Half of the workforce is more or less introverted – it’s no wonder so many are frustrated at work! But figuring out the issue and working with it proactively is the best way to improve your situation.

See Also: Dealing With Stressful Situations (Stress Busting Strategies)