25 Low Stress Jobs For People With Anxiety

It's undeniable:

Today, we feel more stressed than ever at work...

According to CareerCast's 2019 report, 79% of America's workforce feels stressed 'sometimes or frequently' during their working day.

From longer working hours to being bombarded by late night emails, we live in a demanding work culture.

But there's a solution:

Some careers come with a calming working environment and a better work life balance - and still pay surprisingly well.

So here's our list of the top 25 best low stress jobs for people with anxiety...


25 Low Stress Jobs For People With Anxiety

1. Animal Caretaker

Taking care of other people’s animals while they are away is a great way to make a profit while minimizing human interaction.

After all, the majority of your time on the job will be spent merely with animals, not people.

Those with social anxiety often find that working with animals is a great way to make connections with others without feeling like they’re being judged.

While many animals enjoy being politely talked to by humans, caring for an animal rarely involves the need for talking at all, but when you do, the great thing is, animals don’t talk back.

In turn, speaking with animals can help boost your confidence in social situations.

Average Salary: $27,872


2. Transcriptionist

As a transcriptionist, your job revolves around listening to audio recordings and converting them into a written format.

There are both full-time jobs and freelance positions available in transcription.

Transcription jobs are frequently needed in the healthcare field.

A job as a transcriptionist is great for people with anxiety as they are typically great listeners but may fear social interaction.

This is especially true for individuals who have been diagnosed with social anxiety disorder.

However, being a good listener is imperative for a transcriptionist.

Average Salary: $30,920


3. Librarian

If you consider yourself an avid reader and a life-longer learner, a career path as a librarian might peak your interests.

However, to become a librarian, you typically have to have a bachelor’s degree in any subject matter in addition to a master’s degree in library science.

Becoming a librarian is an ideal job for someone with anxiety as there’s limited communication required, except when someone wants to check out a book or has a question.

To top it off, libraries are great environments for those who tend to get overstimulated easily by loud noises since libraries are generally very quiet.


4. Freelance Writer

Writing can be a creative outlet for those with good written communication skills who want to write articles or blog posts part- or full-time.

As an alternative to writing for individual clients and companies, you may instead be interested in starting your own blog, earning profit via ads, sponsors, and/or affiliate links.

However, it is a good idea to get your foot into freelance writing first.

With a passion for writing, great grammar and writing skills, and good organization, freelance writing can be fairly easy.

While clients may ask for edits, this job doesn’t require much communication with clients.

You also have the power to take on less work as needed and work any hour of the day.

Both the flexibility and structure of freelance writing is appealing for many people with anxiety.

Average Salary: $40,148


5. Graphic designer

Those who have a knack for creating digital artwork might enjoy a job as a graphic designer.

Many companies will hire part- or full-time graphic designers, or you may work as a freelance graphic designer, taking orders from clients. You might create graphics by order or might sell your graphics as is.

You may wish to turn your graphics into photo prints, canvas prints, or even t-shirts and sell them online to make extra cash.

Graphic designing can be a very peaceful, creative, and low-stress job for those who already have decent experience in art.

Freelance-wise, this job gives those with anxiety the freedom to pause custom designs during anxious periods while still bringing in income from made-to-stock items they’ve already created.

Average Salary: $43,897


6. Landscaper

If gardening and designing are two of your passions, landscaping might be an applicable career path for you.

This job requires organization, a creative eye, and a general understanding of different types of plants.

Landscaping is ideal for those with anxiety as it is generally a very quiet task. Initially, you will have to communicate with clients.

However, the actual act of landscaping requires little to no communication. Landscaping is also usually slower paced.

Additionally, because landscaping is a primarily outdoor job, those with anxiety may prefer the peace nature has to offer over the chaos of an office or another work environment.

Average Salary: $31,767


7. Mail Carrier

The duties of a mail carrier involve sorting and organizing mail and driving a truck and/or walking on foot to deliver mail and packages to residences and businesses.

College degrees aren’t required for mail carriers, but they must have at least a high school diploma.


There are moments where a carrier will have to interact with others, for instance, if they need to obtain a signature for a special package or envelope from someone.

However, what makes this job enticing for those with anxiety is that it’s a job that doesn’t require much social interaction. 

Many may also find this career peaceful, not too fast-paced, and mostly predictable. 

The repetition and structure surrounding this job tend to be “safe” for anxious individuals.

Average Salary: $48,149


8. Housekeeper

Working in loud, crowded environments tends to be the hardest for people with anxiety.

However, as a housekeeper, you’re usually the only person on the job, and normally, the homeowner is out of the house as you work in peace.

With little communication, few sounds, and minimal distractions, someone with anxiety can clean homes or hotel rooms without constantly feeling like their anxiety is being triggered.

Cleaning also tends to help distract the mind.

However, individuals with severe cases of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) may experience anxiety in a job like this if they are extreme perfectionists and can’t stand being around clutter.

Average Salary: $25,368


9. eCommerce Shop Owner

Owning an online shop or selling products on online marketplaces, you have the potential to make a great flow of cash if you know what you’re doing.

Some people might choose to make their own products like jewellery, soaps, or handmade baby clothes.

Others might resell vintage items for a higher price or dropship products. 

With paid ads or the use of search engine optimization (SEO) in listing descriptions and titles, you may be even more successful.

The best part is, selling items, fulfilling orders, and shipping out your products to customers requires little to no verbal or written communication.

That said, those with social anxiety may be particularly happy with this job.

Being your own boss, you can always un-list your products when your anxiety is particularly high in general.

You may also have the power to fulfil orders while traveling, giving you on-the-go flexibility.

Average Salary: $72,000


10. Painter

Painting is a very therapeutic job for those who have a love for art.

To be a successful painter, you don’t even have to be good at painting.

Pour painting is a type of painting that’s incredibly easy for anyone to engage in, although these do require a lot of paint.

However, these paintings sell well as no two pour paintings are identical to one another.

Many are also willing to buy print versions of these paintings.

Although individuals with anxiety are sometimes perfectionists, being a painter can teach them how to accept their mistakes.

Additionally, this job can allow them to express themselves in visual form, especially if they have no other outlet for mental or emotional release.

Likewise, there’s very little social interaction for those who plan on selling their paintings online.

Average Salary: $43,618


11. Baker

The great thing about wanting to pursue baking as a career path is that there are so many ways you can make this happen.

  • You can work for a pre-existing bakery. 
  • You can make baked goods and sell them online.
  • You can even open up your own storefront, cater for clients, or sell your baked goods at farmers’ markets or events.

Baking is a very precise job, more so than cooking.

While some people might find the accuracy of baking intimidating, others might like the structure of it. 

Some people with anxiety thrive off of career paths that count on them to be precise and accurate. 

Baking also requires very little social interaction, if any, and requires a lot of waiting, making the job low-stress.

Average Salary: $32,555


12. Photographer

Being a photographer is quite a versatile job.

Some might work as a photographer at an indoor photography studio while others might choose to start their own photography business. 

Photoshoots can vary from engagement and wedding shoots to landscape shoots.

As many are aware, photography requires focus.

Focus can be helpful for those who suffer from anxiety as it can help detract their negative thoughts. 

The creative side to photography and the fact that photographers don’t have to communicate too much with their clients makes this job excellent for many anxious individuals.

Average Salary: $45,047


13. Dog Walker

Dog walking can be a very manageable job for someone with a passion for animals and who has a decent experience with working with canines in specific.

Fortunately, walking dogs doesn’t require an exceptional amount of communication skills or knowledge like other animal-related jobs might.

Going on walks can be relaxing for those struggling with anxiety.

However, for some anxious individuals, they might feel vulnerable during walks if they fear crowds, loud traffic, or people staring at them and judging them.

Although, with an animal companion accompanying their walk, they may be distracted from their fears and feel safer.

Average Salary: $31,160


14. Massage Therapist

When someone is feeling stressed, anxious, or tense, one of the first people they might see is a massage therapist. 

While massage therapists are considered people who reduce the stresses of others, the massage therapist themselves may also feel less anxiety by massaging others.

Often massage therapists work in cool, dark, quiet rooms with soft music playing in the background and peaceful aromatics filling the air.

A work condition like this is certainly suitable for anxious individuals.

During a massage, massage therapists typically don’t need to communicate with their client, making this a great potential career for those with social anxiety.

Average Salary: $35,398


15. Factory Worker

Sometimes, the best jobs for people with anxiety are the ones that require you to work “behind-the-scenes.”

If dealing with people isn’t your jam, working in a factory can be a great and less stressful job. 

Often, you won’t need to have any continuing education to work a position in a factory, but you may require certain certifications.

Besides not requiring much verbal communication, working in a factory tends to involve repetitive, simple tasks.

Thus, those with anxiety may not feel as stressed working in a factory as there are minimal changes and uncertainties.

Average Salary: $38,864


16. YouTuber

Becoming a YouTuber means you have the potential to not only make a salary but also be creative in the process.

However, note that due to YouTube’s recent partner program guidelines, you won’t be able to monetize your videos until you’ve earned at least 10,000 video views, meaning creators can’t yet make money until then.

While being a YouTuber can be a stressful job, what makes it right for many folks with anxiety is the fact that you have power over your own content and how frequent you’d like to post.

Those worried about the potential exposure from this platform can always make videos that don’t involve showing their face, like short films or informational videos.

Average Salary: $16,800


17. Computer Programmer

Individuals who are techy and have an understanding of coding may prefer a career path as a computer programmer or software developer.

Many programming jobs require a bachelor’s or master’s degree in computer science or mathematics.

However, these days, there are great coders out there who are freelance programming without a college degree or even professional training.

Programming isn’t for everyone.

However, for people who are good coders, this job can be both exciting and low-stress. 

Coding can be great for some people with anxiety as the job doesn’t necessitate a lot of communication, is very quiet, and tends to involve mostly individual tasks. 

However, it can be stressful if one comes across a coding problem. 

Fortunately, there are coding forums where you can talk with others to learn and resolve your issues.

Average Salary: $61,988


18. Babysitter

Taking care of children for a living is an exciting and creative job for those who love babies and/or kids.

Some people babysit in their spare time, like during weekends or holidays, while others may have a full-time babysitting business.

Some people with anxiety might find babysitting stressful, especially if they are dealing with children with behavioral problems.

However, others might find that interacting with children is a lot easier than socializing with adults.

Entertaining and playing with children can also be distracting for those dealing with frequent anxious thoughts.

Babysitters also have plenty of control over their schedule and how many children they wish to watch at a time.

Average Salary: $33,722


19. Pharmacy Technician

The duties of a pharmacy technician involve counting pills, measuring medication, labelling medication bottles, and supplying instructions to customers.

Technicians don’t have to have a degree other than a high school diploma or an equivalent as they work under a licensed pharmacist.

For those who like the industry and want more pay, they may consider going to school to become a pharmacist.

Being a pharmacy technician, there’s mostly quiet, behind-the-counter work involved that involves simple concentration and repetitive tasks.

Do keep in mind, though, that there’s a decent amount of human interaction required.

Technicians may have to answer phone calls, take payments, and communicate in-person with customers.

Average Salary: $29,276


20. File Clerk

If organization and order are your strong suits, you might consider a file clerk a great possible job.

Companies rely on file clerks to keep paper and/or electronic files and documents in order for them. 

This way, they can find the important information right when they need it, making their job smoother and more consistent.

Apart from filing, you may need to engage in data entry, copying, scanning, and retrieval.

Being a job you can do mostly solo and requiring little social interaction, the job of a file clerk is applicable for individuals with anxiety or who are introverted.

Filing and organizing, while important, tend to involve routine tasks that don’t require a ridiculous amount of stress, heavy lifting, deep intellect, or speed. 

Hours can also be flexible.

Average Salary: $28,774


21. Janitor

Many jobs out there require you to work with others or frequently communicate with customers.

However, as a janitor, you can benefit from plenty of quiet and alone time on the job.

Although janitorial work can be a bit labor-intensive, the good news is, you don’t require a college education to take on this job.

Watching a room or building go from dirty to spotless can give people with anxiety a great sense of achievement.

Many people suffering from an anxiety disorder may be very clean and organized folks as is, making the job duty of a janitor quite fitting.

Average Salary: $25,181


22. Food Delivery Driver

Working in the food service business tends to be busy and fast-paced, which isn’t ideal for most people with anxiety.

However, as a food delivery driver, there’s no such thing as working in a hot, stuffy kitchen.

Others make the food, and you just deliver it to the appropriate address.

You may deliver for a restaurant or deliver via a delivery app like Uber Eats or Grub Hub.

For those with anxiety who find driving soothing, becoming a food delivery driver can be a great job.

Delivering food also requires very little socialization. 

Likewise, you often get plenty of breaks as there may be times where you have to sit and wait for the food to be finished before delivering. 

If you choose to work via a food delivery app, you can turn off your app during those times where you feel overwhelmed.

Average Salary: $27,949


23. Food Preparation Worker

People with anxiety may initially pick a career path that they love but something that they aren’t mentally suitable for.

For example, some may aspire to become a chef, but once they find that the position tends to be fast-paced and highly stressful, they may find themselves in a pickle.

However, food preparation workers have a similar job, but it's less stressful and less fast-moving than being a chef.

The job description of a food preparation worker is fairly self-explanatory: they help prep food for chefs, cooks, or food service managers.

With the routine tasks of sanitizing the kitchen along with cutting, chopping, peeling, slicing, and generally prepping food, those with anxiety may find comfort knowing that this job is uniform and not too varied.

Average Salary: $23,680


24. Animal Breeder

Animal breeding is a great job for those who love science.

Those wishing to breed animals for a living will have to take on responsibilities pertaining to caring for animals, facilitating breeding, aiding with animal births, and keeping reports on their animals. 

No formal training is necessary.

However, it is a good idea to familiarize yourself with this career and what it entails before diving into it.

Relating to animals is often easier for people with anxiety as they have the opportunity to interact and communicate with living beings who won’t put them in a vulnerable position.

Assisting with difficult animal births and distributing medications to injured or sick animals may be stressful when it comes to breeding animals. 

However, working mostly with animals and not people, this job isn’t too noisy, fast, or demanding as other jobs.

Average Salary: $44,650


25. Bus Driver

Although many people have their own vehicles today, public transportation has become one of the most important components of a community.

Public transportation is also safer for the environment than driving individual vehicles.

To become a bus driver, you will need nothing more than a high school diploma or equivalent, a special license to drive a bus, and good and safe driving skills. 

Some people find that driving is therapeutic for them.

Taking on a job as a bus driver may give an anxious individual the freedom and relaxation they need to escape the stresses of their life. 

While passengers can get loud and rowdy at times, for the most part, this job is fairly quiet, is typically predictable, and doesn’t require much socialization.

Average Salary: $30,209


How To Choose The Best Low Stress Job For You

Now that we've reviewed the best low stress jobs for people with anxiety, it's time to pick which one is best for you.

So how do you find that out?

Here's a few things to consider:

  • Look for jobs that you feel will empower and reward you
  • If you're struggling with anxiety or depression, avoid jobs where you have too much time to think or a lack of responsibility
  • You may find that analytical jobs really suit you - because it allows you to focus your anxious energy into being productive
  • Money usually doesn't equate to happiness - whilst you need to pay the bills, ideally you want a job that fulfils you

How To Find A Low Stress Employer

Your working environment is just as important as the job you're doing.

If you don't like the employer you work for - or the team you're working with - you may find you still feel anxious.

So here's a few ways to find your ideal employer:

  • Find an employer that has a workplace culture you love - check out the company's values and philosophy
  • Research your potential employer's reputation online - social media is a great place to research this
  • Find out your job prospects and career map before taking a new job
  • Make sure you meet your manager first - and ask yourself "could you really work for them long term'?